ASTRONOMY 129

I.      General Education Objectives

á      Learn the fundamentals of celestial mechanics, gravitation, the sun, the earth, other solar system planets, their satellites and other solar system objects.

á      Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.

á      Demonstrate the ability to relate astronomy concepts to other disciplines through assignments that include topical, real world problems.

á      Develop an appreciation of the historical and contemporary impact of astronomy on daily life as demonstrated through written assignments or presentations.

 

II.     Learning Outcomes

 

Demonstrate conceptual understanding (through quizzes, projects, and tests) of the following topics:

á      Describe the processes of scientific method and understand the use of significant figures in measurements and calculations. Correctly use units and unit conversions.

á      Express approximate relationships between sizes and distances of astronomical objects

á      Predict how a planetŐs seasons would change if its axis tilt were either larger or smaller

á      Identify EarthŐs axis tilt as the primary reason for its seasons

á      Deduce the phase of the moon from the relative positions of the Sun, Moon, and Earth

á      Explain Lunar and Solar eclipses

á      Distinguish between mass and weight

á      Identify the contributions of Copernicus, Tycho, Kepler, and Galileo to the Copernican revolution. Solve problems involving the NewtonŐs law of gravitation.

á      Identify the planets and their satellites.  Explain how a planetŐs mass, radius, chemical composition, and magnetic fields are related.

á      Explain contemporary theories for the origin of solar system and solar system diversity.

á      Identify EarthŐs energy sources and the fundamental processes in EarthŐs atmosphere

á      Understand the unique process of plate tectonics on Earth.

 

 

Students apply physical/natural principles to analyze and solve problems.

 

Students demonstrate an understanding of the impact that science has on society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASTRONOMY 130

 

 

I.      General Education Objectives

á      Learn the fundamentals of the nature of light, telescopes, the nature of stars and stellar evolution, black holes, galaxies, cosmology, and early universe.

á      Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.

á      Demonstrate the ability to relate astronomy concepts to other disciplines through assignments that include topical, real world problems.

á      Develop an appreciation of the historical and contemporary impact of astronomy on daily life as demonstrated through written assignments or presentations.

 

II.     Learning Outcomes

 

(a) Demonstrate conceptual understanding (through quizzes, projects, and tests) of the following topics:

á        Explain the nature of light and its fundamental importance to astronomy.

á        Explain radiation, Planck radiation curves, and emission and absorption lines created at the atomic level.

á        Describe the principles behind telescopes, CCDs, and spectrographs.

á        Explain how size relates to the performance of telescopes and the advantages of placing telescopes in space.

á        Explain the nature of stars.

á        Explain the birth and death of stars.

á        Interpret H-R diagrams.

á        Explain white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes.

á        Identify basic properties of elliptical and spiral galaxies.

á        Describe the chain of methods used to determine distances in astronomy.

á        Explain dark matter and describe the evidence for its existence.

á        Describe how the age of the universe is related to HubbleŐs constant

á        Explain the origin and evolution of universe.

á        Explain matter, antimatter, and the dimensions of space-time.

á        Describe ongoing searches for extrasolar planets and civilizations.

 

(b) Students apply physical/natural principles to analyze and solve problems.

 

(c) Students demonstrate an understanding of the impact that science has on society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASTRONOMY 129L

I.         Learning Objectives

II.      Learning Outcomes

(a) After the successful completion of this class, the students will be able to:

 

(b) Students apply physical/natural principles to analyze and solve problems.

 

(c) Students demonstrate an understanding of the impact that science has on society.

 

 

ASTRONOMY 130L

I.        Learning Objectives

II.      Learning Outcomes

(a) After the successful completion of this class, the students will be able to:

á        Estimate the distance to a galaxy from its recession velocity using HubbleŐs law.

 

(b) Students apply physical/natural principles to analyze and solve problems.

 

(c) Students demonstrate an understanding of the impact that science has on society.